Wisdom: Sublime

Garden Grove

Samples:

  • dog barking - same recoding of Lou used on Waiting for my Ruca from 40oz to Freedom
  • funky high-pitch "worm" noise - Ohio Players, Funky Worm
  • during the "funky reggae party" line there is a short sample of Sublime, Badfish, 40 oz to Freedom playing in the background
  • "Yeah!" - Beastie Boys, between Girls and Fight for Your Right, Licensed to Ill (1986)
  • "Madness" (pronounced marden-is) - Linton Kwesi Johnson, Five Nights Of Bleeding, In Concert with the Dub Band

References:

  • Garden Grove - City located in northern Orange County, California
  • "funky reggae party" - might be a reference to Bob Marley, Punky Reggae Party, 12" single (1978)
  • the heavy baseline is based on - Courtney Melody, A Ninja Mi Ninja, 7" single (1988)
  • "Duce-Duce" - slang for a .22" caliber gun
  • "picking up trash on a freeway" - common court sentenced community service
  • "roaches in the pot" - cockroaches in the toilet
  • "Music from Jamaica, all the love that I've found" - This phrase was taken from Sublime's earlier tune, Steady B Loop Dub, on Robbin' the Hood

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What I Got

Samples:

  • "Fuck you can't even sing" - Richard Pryor, Have Your Ass Home By 11:00, That Nigger's Crazy
  • drum beat - Pointer Sisters, Yes We Can Can, Blue Thumb (1973) - perhaps not a sample, but more of a drum-line cover
  • "Too Short" - Too $hort, Life is... Too Short, Life is... Too Short (1990)

References:

  • the chorus is a cover of Half Pint, Loving, 20 Super Hits
  • "my mom smokes pot" - The Rolling Scabs, My Mom Smokes Pot, The Gilman Street Project (1988)
  • "never had to battle with a bullet proof vest" - Lauren Hill sang this phrase in The Fugees, Nappy Heads, EP single (1994)
  • the melody is nearly identical to The Beatles, Lady Madonna, single (1968)
  • The Beatles may have also influenced the line, "Life is too short" with their lyric, "Life is very short" from We Can Work It Out, single (1965)

Trivia:

  • The exact same Richard Prior sample was used (also) at the beginning of Ol' Dirty Bastard, Shimmy Shimmy Ya, Return To The 36 Chambers: The Dirty Version (1995)
  • "my dog runs away" - In the early 1990s, Lou Dog disappeared for a week. On the video Sublime Stories, Tales, Lies, & Exaggerations, Troy Dendekker (Bradley Nowell's widow) states that for the week during which Lou Dog was lost, Nowell spent a great deal of time lying on the couch crying in response to the loss of his dog. Lou Dog was eventually returned to Nowell, who, in response to the situation, later covered the Camper Van Beethoven song "The Day That Lassie Went To The Moon" and changed it to "Lou Dog Went to the Moon"; this song can be found on the bootleg "Firecracker Lounge".

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Wrong Way

Samples:

  • Much of the melody/rhythm, as well as, "It's up to you" is based on The Specials, It's Up To You, Specials (1979)

References:

  • "hard to live" - this phrase previously appeared on Sublime's Greatest Hits, Robbin the 'Hood
  • "big salty tears" - The Ziggens, Big Salty Tears, Ignore Amos (1998)

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Same In The End

Samples:

References:

  • "daddy was a rolling stone" - said as "daddy rolling stone" in The Who, Daddy Rolling Stone, single (1965) - there was also a line "Papa was a rolling stone" - The Temptations, Papa Was A Rolling Stone, single (1972) - but perhaps the first song with the phrase was by Muddy Waters, Rollin Stone, single (1950) - and even as influential as that song was to several bands, even it was lifted from the song Catfish Blues (1941) by another guy named Robert Petway (see, this stuff never ends!)
  • Dick Butkis - linebacker for Chicago Bears 1960's and 70's, #51
  • "triple rectified" - advertising term used to describe Brad's MESA Amplifier. The term "rectify" in this situation means to change AC to DC electrical current. These Mesa amps originally had two forms of rectification (analog tube and digital silicon diode). Later, a 2nd analog tube was added and dubbed the "Triple Rectifier". Bradly was obviously proud of this sweet amp.
  • Rectite - a product Pacer Technology (makers of super-glue) tried to get approval on in the 90s without success. Dave Barry jokes about it in a 1995 article for the Miami Herald. This crazy glue was supposed to tightly seal turkey rectums for safety.
  • "I can see for miles and miles and miles" - The Who, I Can See For Miles, The Who Sell Out (1967)

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April 29, 1992

Samples:

  • Police radio - Actual LBPD radio communications
  • "Homicide - Never Doin' no time!" - Just Ice, The Original Gangster Of Hip Hop, Kool & Deadly (1986)
  • "As long as I'm alive, I'ma live illegal" - Mobb Deep, Shook Ones (Pt.1), promo single (1994)
  • "I'm feeling sa-ad..." - Slick Rick & Dougie Fresh, La Di Da Di, The Show (1985)

References:

  • On's Junior Market at 1934 East Anaheim - store once located in Long Beach, see it here
  • Alamitos & Anaheim - Intersection in Long Beach, CA
  • 938 Temple - apartment building in Long Beach
  • "187 on a mutha fucking cop" - Dr. Dre feat. Snoop Dogg, Deep Cover(Remix 187um), single(1992)
  • 187 - police radio code for a homicide
  • 10-15 - police code for "prisoner in custody"
  • 10-4 - code for "message received, understood"
  • "Smoke from all around" - quote of Burn Hollywood Burn by Public Enemy, Fear of a Black Planet (1990)
  • "Where do you think I got this guitar that you're hearing today?" - Brad and the Sublime Crew certainly participated in the riot, or at least the looting by several accounts. From the account of a former employee, the guitar did NOT come from Ten Ton Records, but they did attempt to loot this store (which they formerly thanked on 40oz to Freedom!) for musical instruments.

Trivia:

  • The song is tribute to LA riots over a jury acquitting 3 white police officers of their involvement in the video taped beating of a black man named Rodney King. The event took place on April 29th, 1992 (as titled) but Brad sings "April 26th" - probably just a mistake by Brad that no one caught until the album was being released.
  • The rare "Leary" version of this song containes a clip of Brad singing "Give me my share, I want it.." which can also very faintly be heard on the final cut (@0:22). This lyric is from a song by Jah Rubbaal (aka Jah Rubel), Give Me My Share, Live At Aces (1982). Sublime preformed this cover live on several occasions.
  • The sample of La Di Da Di is from a semi-rare version of the "The Show" because that line, "I'm feeling sad" is a phrase from a different song - Sukiyaki by A Taste of Honey. The copyright on that song was enforced and the line was removed from Slick Rick's CDs sold thereafter.

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Santeria

Samples:

References:

  • Santeria - religion similar to witchcraft
  • Heina - a revered and/or beautiful female, often a girlfriend
  • Sancho - a woman's other man (AKA: that guy that is fucking your lady)
  • Sanchito - an emasculated version of Shancho

Trivia:

  • Parts of this song, such as the bass line and guitar solo, as well as part of the intro, can be heard in Sublime's earlier song, Lincoln Highway Dub from Robbin' The Hood.

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Seed

Samples:

References:

  • "Janie always said I was a mess" - Janie was the name of Brad's Stepmother, and might be the person referred to here.
  • "planting my seed" - to impregnate a woman
  • part of the melody of this song is based on The Bel-Airs, Mr. Moto, single (1961)

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Jailhouse

Samples:

References:

  • this song is largely a cover of Bob Marley and the Wailers, Jailhouse, -One Love- at Studio One (1965)
  • most of the rest is a cover of - Tenor Saw, Roll Call, single (1984)
  • "the 89 vision" - this is in reference to Boogie Down Productions, Hip Hop Rules, Ghetto Music (1989) which contains the phrase, "is it because, we've got the 89 vision?"
  • Baton Stick - police officers in Jamaica are like a military police force and their primary sidearm was the short wooden baton; so, you get beat over the head with it, it breaks and gets shorter, while the damn knot on your head gets you taller
  • Rudy (AKA: Rudie) - short for rudeboy (punk, lawbreaker)
  • Reggae Version - an alternate, normally instrumental or "dub" take on an existing song

Trivia:

  • "I know that I'm gonna be there, yeah. Bud Gaugh will be singing there and Eric Wilson will be bangin' out there" - this portion of the lyrics are very similar to, "The Wailers will be there, The Damned, The Jam, The Clash Maytals will be there..." from Bob Marley, Punky Reggae Party, 12" single (1977) - it's interesting to note that Bob Marley was singing about a party, yet Brad seems to be singing about a "Jailhouse"
  • In KRS-One's song Hip Hop Rules he appears to also be partially covering Tenor Saw's Roll Call with his "Whoa whoa whoa, hey hey hey".
  • KRS-One's term "89 Vision" is explained nicely in an article here by Matt Maguire
  • The Sublime demo song 89 Vision, available on the Sublime box-set, Everything Under The Sun, Bradley repeats the 89 vision theme, borrowing from KRS-One again. This time more precisely, "is it because, we've got the 89 vision?". Furthermore, the phrasing and melody for both Sublime and KRS-One appear influenced by an earlier reggae tune by King Kong, Trouble Again, Legal We Legal (1986)

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Pawn Shop

Samples:

References:

  • very closely based on The Wailing Souls, War Deh Round a John Shop, Stranded (1984)

Trivia:

  • Brad's inspiration for this song seemed to come from the occasional pawning of his guitar for drug money, and subsequently Miguel would always have go buy it back before the next show.

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Paddle Out

Samples:

References:

  • "I'm not here to brag or boast, I'm just here to tell you about the spots that I love the most" - a similar phrase, "I don't mean to brag, I don't mean to boast but we like hot butter on our breakfast toast" occurs on The Sugarhill Gang, Rapper's Delight, Sugarhill Gang, (1979). And an even older phrase, "If I don't brag or boast, click my glass and say a toast" occurs on The Four Tops, Still Waters Run Deep, Still Waters Run Deep (1970).
  • Natural Bridges - a state beach in Santa Cruz
  • Stockton Ave. - street in Santa Cruz
  • Swift Street, John Street - streets with nearby places to surf in Santa Cruz
  • Mitchell's Cove - popular place to surf in Santa Cruz
  • Big Steamer Lane - another popular surf spot in Santa Cruz
  • Surfside Bowl - a surf spot near Anderson St. in Santa Cruz

Trivia:

  • If you hadn't noticed from the links above, Paddle Out is all about Brad's favorite places to surf in Santa Cruz. It's pretty clear in the lyrics when he says, "I'm here to tell you about the spots that I love the most" and then faintly, "part one: Santa Cruz".

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The Ballad Of Johnny Butt

Samples:

References:

  • this song is largely a cover of - Secret Hate, The Ballad of Johnny Butt, Vegetables Dancing: Live and More

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Burritos

Samples:

References:

  • "keep on skanking Ronnie" - Ronald Reagan, the 40th US President; in a semi-rare, early version of this song Fighting Blindly, this line also appears where it is very apparent Brad is talking about Ronald Reagan.
  • "read about O.J." - the OJ Simpson murder trial was dominating the media around the time of this album, also obvious from the above song, April 29th, 1992

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Under My Voodoo

Samples:

References:

  • Voodoo - set of underground religious practices which originated from the traditions of African slave descendants

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Get Ready

Samples:

  • "...you don't wanna go there", "mi never, never wanna..." - KRS One, Speech, Funkmaster Flex Presents The Mix Tape Volume 1: 60 Minutes Of Funk (1995)

References:

  • This song is largely based on Frankie Paul, Get Ready, 12" single (1987)
  • "Crazy Fool" said several times - Sublime often did a rendition of Dee Dee Warwick, Foolish Fool single (1969)

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Caress Me Down

Samples:

References:

  • The English portions are mainly based on Clement Irie, Caress Me Down, 12" single (1980s)
  • Bassline - This is the famous/controversial "Sleng Teng" Riddim. Created by producer Prince Jammy and used first on the song Under Me Sleng Teng, by Wayne Smith (1985). The Riddim is also prominently featured on Pumpkin Belly by Tenor Saw (1985). The Riddim itself is a recreation of the rockabilly song, Somethin' Else by Eddie Cochran, single (1959). In addition this riddim was the likely inspiration for the Pinchers Agony Riddim used by Just-ICE which was prominently featured on 40 oz to Freedom
  • Ron Jeremy - famous male porn star
  • "El Otro Lado" - (the other side) this phrase refers to the US side of the US-Mexico border
  • For a translation of the Spanish, see the lyrics section.

Trivia:

  • "yo fui a Costa Rica para..." - these lyrics are about a trip where Brad and the boys went down to Costa Rica for a while, the people there and radio only played reggae music. Lou Dog even got lost in the jungle for a few days.

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What I Got (reprise)

Samples:

  • unlike the above version, this "reprise" contains no samples.

References:

  • the chorus is a cover of Half Pint, Loving, 20 Super Hits
  • "my mom smokes pot" - The Rolling Scabs, My Mom Smokes Pot, The Gilman Street Project (1988)
  • "never had to battle with a bullet proof vest" - Lauren Hill sang this phrase in The Fugees, Nappy Heads, EP single (1994)
  • the melody is similar to The Beatles, Lady Madonna, single (1968)
  • The Beatles may have also influenced the line, "Life is too short" with their lyric, "Life is very short" from We Can Work It Out, single (1965)

Trivia:

  • What I Got is about focusing on the good things - what you have, not what you don't; no matter how lousy things may seem, you can always find love in your life

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Doin' Time

Samples:

  • screamy-yell noise at about 0:12 - Malcolm McLaren, Buffalo gals, Duck Rock (1983)
  • Jazz Flute and Bassline - Herbie Mann, Summertime, Herbie Mann At the Village Gate (live) (1961)
  • "and when we do it like this, in the place to be" - Beastie Boys, Slow and Low, Licenced to Ill

References:

  • "Summertime when the livin's easy" - George Gershwin, Summertime, Porgy and Bess, (1935)
  • Ras MG - Marshall Goodman (extended member of Sublime)
  • LBC - Long Beach, California
  • "... show them now we've come off the shelf" - Ini Kamoze, Jump for Jah, Statement (1984)

Trivia:

  • As revealed in the S.T.L.E. DVD, the word "Summertime" is actually sung by band "manager" Miguel. The original voice track had Brad singing "Doin' time, and the livin's easy," but the Gershwin people got butthurt and wouldn't give Sublime the rights to the sample unless they changed it. However Brad had recently passed away, so Miguel jumped in the booth and did his best Bradley voice. Read a bit more at Wikipedia.
  • In typical Sublime humor, Brad changed the Ini Kamoze line from "What you gonna do for the world, come out and declare yourself. Show them now we've come off the shelf" to "So what am I gonna be doin' for a while? Said I'm gonna play with myself. Show them how we come off the shelf".

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